Boiling Point of Water for Pour-over Coffee Brewing

202°F is the best boiling point of water for Pour-over Coffee brewing.

Depending on elevation (barometric pressure), water boils at different temperatures. The higher in elevation you are, the lower in temperature water boils; At one atmosphere (sea level) the boiling point of water is 212°F or 100°C. Often you’ll hear that the best water temperature for brewing pour-over coffee is “just off the boil”, but depending on elevation, that boiling point would be different, which is not really optimal for pour-over coffee extraction. Boiling point of water for Ppour-over coffee brewing should be 202°F, not 211°F-203°F.

According this TEDxCoeurdalene video of a talk by Scott Yost, of DOMA Coffee, 202° is the perfect temperature for pour-over coffee extraction. Since seeing that video a couple years ago, we’ve been setting our Bonavita Automatic Kettle at 202°, which seems to be producing the best extractions. After a recent trip we found ourselves at over 6,000 feet above sea level, the water was boiling at around 202° so we were technically using boiling water on the coffee. The water temperature, while boiling, was still 202°. The main thing is that the water shouldn’t be hotter than 202°.

Just off the boil is misleading if you really want the best extraction. Accurate temperature readings combined with a proper coffee grind will work the best for pour-over coffee. But you’ll need some way for accurate temperature gauging. A good kitchen thermometer or a kettle that you can set the temperature with, will provide the accuracy you’ll need for the best cup of pour-over coffee.

For the best pour-over coffee brewing results:

  1. Correct Water Temperature
  2. Properly Ground Coffee

Happy brewing!

Hario V60 vs Kalita Wave Coffee Dripper

Kalita 185 vs Hario V60 pour over coffee drippers
The Hario V60 vs Kalita Wave Coffee Dripper smackdown!

Hario V60 pour-over coffee dripper has been the Champion of pour-over coffee brewing among aficionados for decades. But now there is challenger in the ring going after the belt. We pit the Hario V60 vs Kalita Wave coffee dripper to find out which is better.

pourover-coffee-world-kalita185-basketThe Kalita Wave dripper, made in Japan, offers a different process of drip coffee brewing. Most noticable is the flat bottom basket, rather than cone-shaped like the Hario V60. The brewing process is a little more like a Vietnamese coffee in that the coffee steeps a little longer. The result is a longer extraction time than what you typically get with a Hario V60 coffee dripper, which has a large single hole, and lots of bam bam!

pourover-coffee-world-kalita185-dripsCoffee passes through the grounds faster in the Hario V60. The flat bottom and three tiny holes cause the water to pass through the Kalita Wave coffee dripper slower. Since the extraction is longer, more flavors and oils come out of the grounds.

Speed had Kalita Wave on the ropes at first, we were able to drink our cup sooner from the Hario V60. But Kalita came on strong in the later rounds and the fuller flavor won out.

Conclusion

pourover-coffee-world-kalita-wave185-boxKalita Wave was a tough challenger against Hario V60, a solid defender, and after going head to head for over a year now, we give the edge to Kalita Wave for a richer, fuller flavor pour-over coffee. This is not to suggest that using the Hario V60 is bad, Hario threw it down and is still a great pour-over coffee dripper who is not ready to hang up the pour-over coffee gloves. We use the V60 frequently. In the final round the differences were subtle. And one brewer probably suits certain types of beans and roasts over the other. Keeping that in mind you’ll have be the judge.

The Kalita Wave comes in stainless steel, glass and ceramic. Since we’re prone to breaking drippers, we recommend the stainless. There a two sizes are available, #155 and the #185, the #155 is fairly small and can’t hold much more that 10-15 grams of coffee grounds. The #185 is similar to the Hario V60 in capacity and will perfect for normal everyday brewing.

To purchase the Kalita Wave #185 coffee dripper shop here

Check out our quick look at the Kalita Wave 185 Pour-over Coffee Dripper:

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Water to Coffee Ratio for Pour-over Coffee Brewing

Water to Coffee Ratio for Pour-over Coffee Brewing

Use a 16:1 Water to Coffee

Always start with good fresh-roasted coffee and filtered water; successful pour-over coffee brewing comes down to ratios. For pour-over coffee brewing water to coffee ratio a general rule of thumb is 16 parts (grams) water to 1 part (grams) coffee. To measure and brew properly you need a good scale. While most digital kitchen scales will do the trick, it’s worth considering an investment  in a Hario Drip Scale/Timer, it’s designed especially for pour-over and is very easy to use. More information on the Hario Drip scale here.

Some of the water will be absorbed in the grounds and will not end up in your cup, the ratio compensates for that, ergo, 300 grams of water will not equal 300 grams in your cup. It’s hard to calculate the actual yield, which depends on the amount of coffee grounds used.

Once you have the scale you can accurately measure and brew your pour-over coffee. Feel free to experiment on the ratios to adjust for your taste. Enjoy!

How to Brew Pour-Over Coffee

How to brew pour-over coffee. Getting a great cup of coffee requires the right brewing equipment, fresh roasted coffee and a perfected pour-over coffee technique. This post covers the basic elements for success. Once mastered, pour-over coffee brewing is simple and easy to repeat. Having the right beans and equipment is key as well, but it starts with technique. A $40 100% Kona Peaberry can be ruined by too fine of a grind, so a good burr grinder set to the proper grind setting is important, as is using a goose-neck kettle, for better control of the pour, it makes a big difference.

 

Items needed:

  • Goose-neck drip kettle
  • Cone style coffee dripper
  • Paper filters
  • Digital kitchen scale
  • Burr coffee grinder
  • A cup or decanter
  • Kitchen thermometer

Heat the water

Bring the water to a boil then remove from the heating element. If you are using a temperature controlled electric kettle, just bring it up to a preset temp and hold. The optimal temperature is in the 198-201 degree range (depending on altitude, water will boil at a lower temperature).

Rinse the paper filter

Place the filter in the cone. Be sure to fold the seams over flat to make the filter sit better in the cone. Rinse your paper filter with the some of the heated water.

Grind and measure the coffee grounds

Weigh out the fresh beans to a 1:16 ratio, in grams, coffee to water. Experiment with ratios to suit taste. Grind to a medium-fine texture, the ground coffee grains should be about the size of sand. Note: A courser grind will cause the coffee to under-extract, resulting in a watery cup of coffee, too fine of a grind and the grounds will over-extract and taste bitter. Place your cup or decanter on the kitchen scale and zero (Tare) it. Add the coffee to the filter, level and slightly indent the center.
Zero the scale.

Bloom the coffee

Pre-infuse the coffee first. Pour 40-60g of hot water into the center of the grounds and work your way out, in expanding circles, until you reach the edge of the grounds. Some people recommend that you stop short of the edge leaving a 1/8 inch or so of the coffee dry. It probably doesn’t make a difference.

Let sit for 45-70 seconds. Note: the fresher the beans the more the grounds will expand as they release gases, older roasted coffee may not bloom at all. Let the bloom deflate before adding more water.

Start the main pour

After blooming, start the main pour, beginning from the center, pour the remaining water into the cone. Some like the do this in stages, pour, rest, pour, rest, etc. This should take around 2-3 minutes. Try to keep the water level above the coffee grounds, keeping oxygen from coming into contact with the coffee before you finish the pour. Take your time

Enjoy your cup!

Practice makes perfect! With good fresh coffee, proper equipment and technique you’ll be a pour-over master in no time.

Things to remember:

  1. Grind
  2. Measure
  3. Bloom
  4. Pour slowly

The Art of Pour Over Coffee by Joe Bean Coffee Roasters via Whole Latte Love

Here are a couple videos the demonstrate the pour-over coffee technique.

Tom from Sweet Maria’s gives you the lowdown:

From Kyle Evans at The Roasterie:

Some articles:
The Coffee Geek

Prima Coffee Equipment

The Kitchn: How to Brew Great Coffee The Pour Over Method

Pour Over Coffee Brewer

Pour Over Coffee Brewer

You know the situation; it’s a workday and you woke up late and now there’s not enough time to do a traditional pour over coffee, forget picking something up on the way to work, the lines are always too long! Wouldn’t it be nice to have an coffee brewer that made pour over coffee, and even better, automatically? Lo and behold! There are a few pour over coffee brewers available. They range in price from $180 to $570, and these brewers meet the SCAA Certified Home Brewer standards of the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA). So you know you’re not wasting your money.

Why bother with a brewer that specializes in the pour over coffee method? Besides being the best way to brew coffee, pour over coffee brewers offer a simple hassle-free way to brew pour over coffee. Since they are automatic, you just set it at night and wake up to a fresh cup of pour over coffee. What could beat that? Other than a personal valet who makes pour over coffee for you, nothing obviously.

So check out our Pour Over Coffee Brewers buying guide.

Hario V60 Drip Scale Review

Hario V60 Drip Scale Review

Hario V60 Drip Scale is the perfect digital scale for pour-over coffee brewing.

 

UPDATE: We reviewed the Hario V60 Drip Scale 3 years ago. This is an update.

After daily multiple uses, this scale is still going strong. Everything works as if it was just purchased. One notable item to mention is this, do not let the liquids run over the brim of your cup. The liquid will get inside the scale and make it stop working. Occasionally a suction formed around the rubber collar and the cone of the Metal Hario V60 Dripper, and caused the coffee to run down the side of he cup and into the scale. But don’t panic, remove the batteries, pour out any liquid got inside the scale and place, on end, in a sunny window to evaporate the coffee from the scale, take care to be certain it’s 100% dry before replacing the batteries and using. This happened several times and every time the Hario V60 Digital Scale worked perfectly. This is not to suggest that you should make a habit of this act of carelessness, take care of your digital scale.

Original Hario V60 Drip Scale post:

Pour Over Coffee World Hario V60 Drip ScaleAfter going cheap and trying a standard kitchen scale it became apparent it was fairly useless for accurate pour-over coffee brewing. Why? The one we tested shut off after two minutes, the proper brew time for pour-over coffee is at least 3 minutes. The second issue is the lack of a timer. When brewing pour-over coffee you need to time the bloom and then the remaining pour. Hario V60 Drip Scale has a built-in timer which is pretty handy for the groggy mind in the wee hours.

Hario V60 Drip Scale is easy to use

Pour Over Coffee World Hario V60 Drip ScaleAfter unboxing you’ll find the unit compact and well designed. It was refreshing to see the controls simple and easy to press. The scale uses the metric system, measuring to the 1/10 of a gram if needed, an extra push of the ON/OFF TARE button was needed.

Place your cup or carafe and Hario V60 Dripper with a moistened filter on the scale then press TARE button until it reads zero. Add freshly ground coffee to desired measurement, usually 24g. Press TARE again. Bloom coffee with 30-60g of hot water, start timer, bloom for around one minute. The add water in increments for 3 minutes totaling 385g.

Minimalist design

Pour Over Coffee World Hario V60 Drip ScaleWe thought the Hario V60 Drip Scale was a sharp-looking device. Kudos to Hario’s industrial design team and general aesthetic. The construction is plastic and the finish is flat black. Stains will show, but wipe off easily.

The unit is compact, light-weight and easy to handle. We found it felt a bit on the light side after using a heavier kitchen model.

The display is a typical LED, no back light though, we don’t know if this is a problem, figuring that not many people brew pour-over coffee in the dark, but maybe people with vision issues will find it difficult to read.

Pour Over Coffee World Hario V60 Drip ScaleOn the back is a wall hanging hole for wall storage. The plastic will scratch when finding the hook with hole, as we regrettably found out. So be careful.

Conclusion

We are very happy with the Hario V60 Drip Scale, with only one regret: that we didn’t get one sooner! Pour-over Coffee World gives the Hario V60 Drip Scale 4 1/2 stars. Buy one now. A great Father’s Day gift idea.

 

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